Gutting the Military

When China and Russia are fielding stealth aircraft potentially as capable, and more than a decade newer than ours, nearly a decade sooner than the “experts” who want to justify cutting the military budget said it would happen, is it a good idea to gut the military? When China has already developed, and continues to develop weaponry that could deny us access to the western Pacific if they choose to do so, is it smart let them gain a technological and numerical advantage if we wish to maintain a presence in the western Pacific and aid our allies there?

There are inefficiencies in the military budgets, granted. Forcing units to buy $300 hammers and $200 battery clocks that break quickly from Lighthouse for the Blind or some other politically favored vendor doesn’t ALLOW efficient use of the money the military is given. Allowing contractors to low-ball bids and get away with non-performance costs us billions every year.

If we don’t quit using the military as a social experiment, we’re not going to have any warriors or any weapons left to defend us.

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From airforce-magazine.com, July 21st, 2011:

There Goes $49 Billion, with a "B":

The Air Force’s initial share of the $400 billion, 12-year defense budget cut imposed by President Obama is $49 billion from the next five years, Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Philip Breedlove said Wednesday. Addressing AFA’s Mitchell Institute in Arlington, Va., Breedlove apologized for the brevity of his appearance, saying he had to resume a presentation to service Secretary Michael Donley and Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz "about how we’re going to get through the next five years without $49 billion." Breedlove said the intensive budget cutting drill has consumed "the last 10 days of my life," and he was heading back to "defend my skin." He warned contractors attending the event that the Air Force will be even more financially constrained and will insist more than ever on programs being delivered as promised, on time and on budget.

Grim Forecast: The Air Force is facing a grim situation, in terms of money and technology, Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Philip Breedlove said Wednesday during a speech sponsored by AFA’s Mitchell Institute in Arlington, Va. Breedlove noted that when the Air Force last went through a sharp postwar budget drawdown in the early 1990s, it had just come through a strong period of modernization. Now, extreme fiscal austerity follows a period in which aircraft weren’t replaced, and are "the oldest we’ve ever operated," he said. Breedlove summed up the situation this way: "We’re in a tough spot. We see near-peers or peer competitors beginning to build similar capabilities [to those of USAF] in stealth, . . . long range strike, [and] missile technology. . . . These countries have money and they have a very deliberate plan which they are going to execute, and they will bring pressure to our advantages across the world, all at the same time." The Air Force, he said, faces "increased and prolonged fiscal pressure that will challenge our ability to remain ahead of that . . . technology curve." The service will have to "think our way through some of these issues, where clearly we will not be able to buy our way through," he added.

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